Twitter as Graffiti

6 thoughts on “Twitter as Graffiti”

  1. I think that's a helpful perspective. Though there's not much of a learning curve on Twitter, there's an adaptation curve. “What will this give me and how will I contribute?” is an evolutionary process. And there's always the charitable response to fall back on. If someone I follow tweets “Can't decide whether to walk or bike today,” well, Rainwater+Duck's back = move along. It cost me about 8 nanoseconds of my time unless I allow it to distract or irritate me.

  2. I think that’s a helpful perspective. Though there’s not much of a learning curve on Twitter, there’s an adaptation curve. “What will this give me and how will I contribute?” is an evolutionary process.

    And there’s always the charitable response to fall back on. If someone I follow tweets “Can’t decide whether to walk or bike today,” well, Rainwater+Duck’s back = move along. It cost me about 8 nanoseconds of my time unless I allow it to distract or irritate me.

  3. I think that’s a helpful perspective. Though there’s not much of a learning curve on Twitter, there’s an adaptation curve. “What will this give me and how will I contribute?” is an evolutionary process.

    And there’s always the charitable response to fall back on. If someone I follow tweets “Can’t decide whether to walk or bike today,” well, Rainwater+Duck’s back = move along. It cost me about 8 nanoseconds of my time unless I allow it to distract or irritate me.

  4. I think that’s a helpful perspective. Though there’s not much of a learning curve on Twitter, there’s an adaptation curve. “What will this give me and how will I contribute?” is an evolutionary process.

    And there’s always the charitable response to fall back on. If someone I follow tweets “Can’t decide whether to walk or bike today,” well, Rainwater+Duck’s back = move along. It cost me about 8 nanoseconds of my time unless I allow it to distract or irritate me.

  5. I think that’s a helpful perspective. Though there’s not much of a learning curve on Twitter, there’s an adaptation curve. “What will this give me and how will I contribute?” is an evolutionary process.

    And there’s always the charitable response to fall back on. If someone I follow tweets “Can’t decide whether to walk or bike today,” well, Rainwater+Duck’s back = move along. It cost me about 8 nanoseconds of my time unless I allow it to distract or irritate me.

  6. I think that's a helpful perspective. Though there's not much of a learning curve on Twitter, there's an adaptation curve. “What will this give me and how will I contribute?” is an evolutionary process. And there's always the charitable response to fall back on. If someone I follow tweets “Can't decide whether to walk or bike today,” well, Rainwater+Duck's back = move along. It cost me about 8 nanoseconds of my time unless I allow it to distract or irritate me.

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