“There is tremendous strength in independence and decentralization.”

“There is tremendous strength in independence and decentralization.” Daring Fireball: Medium Deprecates Custom Domains Service — Read on daringfireball.net/linked/2018/09/04/medium-domain-name Shouldn’t be surprised but John makes a great point about the long term value of owning your own domain name and links. We freely give away too much content and work to commercial companies like Medium … Continue reading “There is tremendous strength in independence and decentralization.”

Links Are (Still) Dead

I first wrote that “Links Are Dead” in 2006, and pretty much got shouted out of the blogosphere. I kept up the mantra over the years. Looks like Google agrees with me now… But over time, URLs have gotten more and more difficult to read and understand. As web functionality has expanded, URLs have increasingly … Continue reading Links Are (Still) Dead

Overwriting Monuments with AR

I do think augmented reality and voice-first computing (Siri, Alexa, Google Assistant etc) will get us out behind computer screens and keyboards and into the “real” world. What “real” means is subjective, and that will only intensify in the coming decades as computing comes full circle to being something that we naturally do with our … Continue reading Overwriting Monuments with AR

Google To Start Marking Sites Without HTTPS as Not Secure in July

If your nonprofit, church, or business website isn’t https:// with a reputable SSL certificate, Google’s Chrome browser update will start showing a warning message when visitors arrive. This will affect your site’s trustworthiness. Get in touch if you need help or what to know more. You can also read a great take (and much needed … Continue reading Google To Start Marking Sites Without HTTPS as Not Secure in July

A brief history of the internet

The existing national defense network relied on telephone lines and wires that were susceptible to damage. In 1962, J.C.R. Licklider, a scientist from ARPA and MIT, suggested connecting computers to keep a communications network active in the US in the event of a nuclear attack. — Read on sciencenode.org/feature/a-brief-history-of-the-internet-2018.php Continue reading A brief history of the internet

Microsoft and Apple helped build new braille display standard

It’s really nice to see traditional rivals like Apple and Microsoft working together on something as important as accessibility. Hopefully this partnership is fruitful and the two companies (along with other tech industry leaders) continue to work to make computers and technology more accessible for those with different kinds of impairments. — Read on www.engadget.com/2018/05/31/microsoft-apple-usb-if-accessibility-braille-display-standard/ Continue reading Microsoft and Apple helped build new braille display standard

Faster horses

I don’t know… this feels a little like Henry Ford’s “if I had asked what people wanted, they would have said a faster horse” approach to utilizing tech to save humans time… Like Google, we envision a future that’s based on collaboration between humans and machines. Where we seem to differ is that we believe … Continue reading Faster horses

Siri and Incarnation

The theological lens through which we might view these questions is incarnation. In an age of increased engagement with disembodied digital assistants, what might it mean for the church to counterweight this with insisting on and facilitating in-person fellowship? In an era of disembodied conversation, my prayer is that the church might be a contrast … Continue reading Siri and Incarnation

Most People Don’t Want Privacy

The broader question is the tradeoff between privacy and advertising. While a tempting noun, most people don’t really *want* privacy, let alone understand what that means. It’s definitely not an unattainable goal, but it does require work… which is something many of our fellow citizens are reluctant to pursue when it comes to such technological conditions. Third, … Continue reading Most People Don’t Want Privacy

Artificial Intelligence Opens the Vatican Secret Archives

Like all artificial intelligence, the software will improve over time, as it digests more text. Even more exciting, the general strategy of In Codice Ratio—jigsaw segmentation, plus crowdsourced training of the software—could easily be adapted to read texts in other languages. This could potentially do for handwritten documents what Google Books did for printed matter: … Continue reading Artificial Intelligence Opens the Vatican Secret Archives

Computational Explosion

Sergey Brin, President of Alphabet (Google’s parent company), on the computational explosion over the last few years and near-future possibilities of quantum computing in the annual Founders Letter: The power and potential of computation to tackle important problems has never been greater. In the last few years, the cost of computation has continued to plummet. … Continue reading Computational Explosion